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Windows Server 2012 : Comprehensive Performance Analysis and Logging (part 8) - Collecting performance counter data, Collecting performance trace data

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2/3/2015 8:47:06 PM

Collecting performance counter data

Data collectors can be used to record performance data on the selected counters at a specific sampling interval. For example, you could sample performance data for the CPU every 15 minutes. The default location for logging is %SystemDrive%\PerfLogs\Admin. Log files can grow in size very quickly. If you plan to log data for an extended period, be sure to place the log file on a drive with lots of free space. Remember, the more frequently you update the log file, the greater the drive space and CPU resource usage on the system.

To collect performance counter data, follow these steps:

  1. In Performance Monitor, under the Data Collector Sets node, press and hold or right-click the User Defined node in the left pane, point to New, and then choose Data Collector Set.

  2. In the Create New Data Collector Set Wizard, shown in Figure 17, type a name for the data collector, such as Memory Monitor or Physical Disk Monitor. Afterward, select the Create Manually (Advanced) option and then tap or click Next.

    Specify the name of the collector set.
    Figure 17. Specify the name of the collector set.
  3. On the What Type Of Data Do You Want To Include page, the Create Data Logs option is selected by default. Select the Performance Counter check box, and then tap or click Next.

  4. On the Which Performance Counters Would You Like To Log page, tap or click Add. This displays the Add Counters dialog box, which you can use as previously discussed to select the performance counters to track. When you are finished selecting counters, tap or click OK.

  5. On the Which Performance Counters Would You Like To Log page, type in a sample interval and select a time unit in seconds, minutes, hours, days, or weeks. The sample interval specifies when new data is collected. For example, if you sample every 15 minutes, the data log is updated every 15 minutes. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  6. On the Where Would You Like The Data To Be Saved page, type the root path to use for logging collected data. Alternatively, tap or click Browse and then use the Browse For Folder dialog box to select the logging directory. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  7. On the Create New Data Collector Set page, the Run As box lists <Default> as the user to indicate that the log will run under the privileges and permissions of the default system account. To run the log with the privileges and permissions of another user, tap or click Change. Type the user name and password for the desired account, and then tap or click OK. User names can be entered in DOMAIN\USERNAME format, such as CPANDL\WilliamS for the WilliamS account in the CPANDL domain.

  8. Select the Open Properties For This Data Collector Set option, and then tap or click Finish. This saves the data collector set, closes the wizard, and then opens the related Properties dialog box.

  9. By default, logging is configured to start manually. To configure a logging schedule, tap or click the Schedule tab and then tap or click Add. You can now set the active range, start time, and run days for data collection.

  10. By default, logging stops only if you set an expiration date as part of the logging schedule. Using the options on the Stop Condition tab, you can configure the log file to stop manually after a specified period of time, such as seven days, or when the log file is full (if you set a maximum size limit).

  11. Tap or click OK when you finish setting the logging schedule and stop conditions. If you want Windows to run a scheduled task when data collection stops, configure the tasks on the Task tab in the Properties dialog box.

Collecting performance trace data

You can use data collectors to record performance trace data whenever events related to their source providers occur. A source provider is an application or operating system service that has traceable events.

To collect performance trace data, follow these steps:

  1. In Performance Monitor, under the Data Collector Sets node, press and hold or right-click the User-Defined node in the left pane, point to New, and then choose Data Collector Set.

  2. In the Create New Data Collector Set Wizard, type a name for the data collector, such as Disk IO Trace or Logon Trace. Afterward, select the Create Manually (Advanced) option and then tap or click Next.

  3. On the What Type Of Data Do You Want To Include page, the Create Data Logs option is selected by default. Select the Event Trace Data check box, and then tap or click Next.

  4. On the Which Event Trace Providers Would You Like To Enable page, tap or click Add.

  5. In the Event Trace Providers dialog box, shown in Figure 18, select an event trace provider to track, such as Active Directory: NetLogon, and then tap or click OK.

    Select a provider to trace.
    Figure 18. Select a provider to trace.
  6. On the Which Event Trace Providers Would You Like To Enable page, you can configure property values to track. By selecting individual properties in the Properties list and tapping or clicking Edit, you can track particular property values rather than all values for the provider. Repeat this process to select other event trace providers to track. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  7. On the Where Would You Like The Data To Be Saved page, type the root path to use for logging collected data. Alternatively, tap or click Browse and then use the Browse For Folder dialog box to select the logging directory. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  8. On the Create New Data Collector Set page, the Run As box lists <Default> as the user to indicate that the log will run under the privileges and permissions of the default system account. To run the log with the privileges and permissions of another user, tap or click Change. Type the user name and password for the desired account, and then tap or click OK. User names can be entered in DOMAIN\USERNAME format, such as CPANDL\WilliamS for the WilliamS account in the CPANDL domain.

  9. Select the Open Properties For This Data Collector Set option, and then tap or click Finish. This saves the data collector set, closes the wizard, and then opens the related Properties dialog box.

  10. By default, logging is configured to start manually. To configure a logging schedule, tap or click the Schedule tab and then tap or click Add. You can now set the active range, start time, and run days for data collection.

  11. By default, logging stops only if you set an expiration date as part of the logging schedule. Using the options on the Stop Condition tab, you can configure the log file to stop manually after a specified period of time, such as seven days, or when the log file is full (if you set a maximum size limit).

  12. Tap or click OK when you finish setting the logging schedule and stop conditions.If you want Windows to run a scheduled task when data collection stops, configure the tasks on the Task tab in the Properties dialog box.

Collecting configuration data

You can use data collectors to record changes in registry configuration. To collect configuration data, follow these steps:

  1. In Performance Monitor, under the Data Collector Sets node, press and hold or right-click the User-Defined node in the left pane, point to New, and then choose Data Collector Set.

  2. In the Create New Data Collector Set Wizard, type a name for the data collector, such as System Registry Info or Current User Registry Info. Afterward, select the Create Manually (Advanced) option and then tap or click Next.

  3. On the What Type Of Data Do You Want To Include page, the Create Data Logs option is selected by default. Select the System Configuration Information check box and then tap or click Next.

  4. On the Which Registry Keys Would You Like To Record page, tap or click Add. Type the registry path to track. Repeat this process to add other registry paths to track. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  5. On the Where Would You Like The Data To Be Saved page, type the root path to use for logging collected data. Alternatively, tap or click Browse and then use the Browse For Folder dialog box to select the logging directory. Tap or click Next when you are ready to continue.

  6. On the Create New Data Collector Set page, the Run As box lists <Default> as the user to indicate that the log will run under the privileges and permissions of the default system account. To run the log with the privileges and permissions of another user, tap or click Change. Type the user name and password for the desired account, and then tap or click OK. User names can be entered in DOMAIN\USERNAME format, such as CPANDL\WilliamS for the WilliamS account in the CPANDL domain.

  7. Select the Open Properties For This Data Collector Set option, and then tap or click Finish. This saves the data collector set, closes the wizard, and then opens the related Properties dialog box.

  8. By default, logging is configured to start manually. To configure a logging schedule, tap or click on the Schedule tab and then tap or click Add. You can now set the active range, start time, and run days for data collection.

  9. By default, logging stops only if you set an expiration date as part of the logging schedule. Using the options on the Stop Condition tab, you can configure the log file to stop manually after a specified period of time, such as seven days, or when the log file is full (if you set a maximum size limit).

  10. Tap or click OK when you finish setting the logging schedule and stop conditions. If you want Windows to run a scheduled task when data collection stops, configure the tasks on the Task tab in the Properties dialog box.

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