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SQL Server 2008 R2 : Creating and Managing Indexes - Creating Indexes (part 2) - Creating Indexes with SSMS
SQL Server 2008 has many options for creating indexes within SSMS. You can create indexes within SSMS via the Database Engine Tuning Advisor, database diagrams, the Table Designer, and several places within the Object Explorer.
SQL Server 2008 R2 : Creating and Managing Indexes - Creating Indexes (part 1) - Creating Indexes with T-SQL
Transact-SQL (T-SQL) is the most fundamental means for creating an index. This method was available in all previous versions of SQL Server. It is a very powerful option for creating indexes because the T-SQL statements that create indexes can be stored in a file and run as part of a database installation or upgrade.
SQL Server 2008 R2 : Creating and Managing Indexes - Types of Indexes
SQL Server has two main types of indexes: clustered and nonclustered. They both help the query engine get at data faster, but they have different effects on the storage of the underlying data. The following sections describe these two main types of indexes and provide some insight into when to use each type.
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - Building Your First Cube (part 5) - Using the Dimension Designer
The dimension designer, like the cube designer, has tabs across the top and a three-pane view in the rest of the window. Within the Dimension Structure tab, the Attributes pane is on the left, the Hierarchies And Levels pane is in the center, and the Data Source View pane is on the right.
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - Building Your First Cube (part 4) - Using the Dimension Wizard
To invoke the Dimension Wizard and create a dimension (which we’ll need to do because we haven’t yet created our time dimension), choose the Cube/Add Cube Dimension... option, select the Add Cube Dimension... option from the Dimension pane’s shortcut menus, or click the Add Cube Dimension toolbar button (sixth from left).
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - Building Your First Cube (part 3) - Creating a Cube with the Cube Wizard, Using the Cube Designer
Once you’re done perfecting your data source view, close it and save your changes. You’re now ready to build your cube! To do this, select the Project/New Cube... main menu option, or right-click the Cubes folder in Solution Explorer and select the New Cube... option from the shortcut menu to bring up the Cube Wizard.
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - Building Your First Cube (part 2) - Adding a Data Source View
This can be a great shortcut: If you include the fact table first and then click Add Related Tables, you can often move over all the dimension tables at once, depending on the design of your star schema database. Because we’re using views and an unrelated table for our dimension tables, this shortcut will not work in our particular case.
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - Building Your First Cube (part 1) - Creating the Project
For example, a single Visual Studio 2005 solution could contain an Analysis Services project, an Integration Services project, a Reporting Services project, and various C# or Visual Basic .NET projects including a Windows Forms application, a Class Library project, and/or an ASP.NET Web site.
SQL Server 2005 : Basic OLAP - OLAP 101
SQL Server first brought OLAP functionality to us in version 7 with OLAP Services, a product that was essentially separate from, though bundled with, SQL Server proper. SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services included better OLAP functionality and new data mining capabilities but offered only slightly better integration with the SQL Server relational database.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Server Architecture
Reporting Services combines a mix of Microsoft technologies to create a scalable server-based reporting architecture. You can view this as a middle-tier server in your enterprise planning scenarios. It is one part Web server and one part database server, with a dash of .NET managed code to bring all the pieces together.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Management - Publishing, SQL Server Management Studio
Completed report definitions are loaded to a report server, where they can be accessed and subscribed to. The process of loading the report is referred to as publishing. The report is parsed and stored in an SQL database partially compiled, somewhat like a Transact-SQL (T-SQL) stored procedure.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Access and Delivery (part 2) - Presentation Formats, Programming: Rendering
Report output can be produced in a variety of Web-, page-, and desktop-compatible formats. You cannot edit these files using the Reporting Services tools, but third-party products are available to fit this need.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Access and Delivery (part 1) - Delivery on Demand, Subscriptions
Several methods are available for delivering reports to users on demand or by subscription. Most popular is the Report Manager interface described earlier. You can embed reports in SharePoint Portal using the included Web parts.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Change Tracking (part 2) - Identifying Tracked Changes, Identifying Changed Columns, Change Tracking Overhead
After Change Tracking is enabled for a table, any data modification statements that affect rows in the table cause Change Tracking information for each modified row to be recorded. To query for the rows that have changed and to obtain information about the changes, you can use the built-in Change Tracking functions.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Change Tracking (part 1) - Implementing Change Tracking
In addition to Change Data Capture, SQL Server 2008 also introduces Change Tracking. Change Tracking is a lightweight solution that provides an efficient change tracking mechanism for applications. Although they are similar in name, the purposes of Change Tracking and Change Data Capture are different.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Definition and Design (part 3) - Report Builder
Report Builder is an ad hoc reporting tool delivered as a .NET 2.0 ClickOnce application that a user downloads from the report server. Predesigned report templates are used as a design surface, with drag-and-drop placeholders for data.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Definition and Design (part 2) - Report Designer
Report Designer has a rich set of features that will satisfy report professionals and programmers. Reports can be simple or complex, highly structured or free form, static or interactive. You have complete control over layout, formatting, formulas, and pagination.
SQL Server 2005 : Report Definition and Design (part 1) - Data Sources, Report Layouts
Reporting Services includes a professional report design tool called Report Designer that is hosted in Visual Studio 2005 or SQL Server Business Intelligence Development Studio. Report Designer provides rich graphical query tools, report layout design surfaces, and a built-in report viewer.
Monitoring MySQL : Database Performance (part 2) - Database Optimization Best Practices
Rather than passing judgment or suggesting any particular tool or technique, we will instead discuss the most common best practices for improving database performance. We encourage you to examine some of the texts referenced earlier for more detail on each of these practices.
Monitoring MySQL : Database Performance (part 1) - Measuring Database Performance
While the basic MySQL installation does not include formal tools for monitoring database improvement, the MySQL Enterprise Manager suite offers a host of performance monitoring features.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Change Data Capture (part 2) - Querying the CDC Tables
After you enable change data tracking for a table, SQL Server begins capturing any data changes for the table in the Change Data Capture tables. To identify the data changes, you need to query the Change Data Capture tables.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Change Data Capture (part 1)
In SQL Server 2008, Microsoft introduced a new feature called Change Data Capture (CDC), which is designed to make it much easier and less resource intensive to identify and retrieve changed data from tables in an online transaction processing (OLTP) database.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Spatial Data Types (part 3) - Spatial Data Support in SSMS
When querying spatial data in SSMS, you’ll find that SSMS has a built-in capability to plot and display some basic maps of your spatial data.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Spatial Data Types (part 2) - Working with Geography Data
The GEOGRAPHY data type is also implemented as a .NET common language runtime data type in SQL Server. Unlike the GEOMETRY data type in which locations are defined in terms of X and Y coordinates that can conceivably extend to infinity, the GEOGRAPHY type represents data in a round-earth coordinate system.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Spatial Data Types (part 1) - Representing Spatial Data, Working with Geometry Data
The geometry data type is implemented as a common language runtime (CLR) data type in SQL Server and is used to represent data in a Euclidean (flat) coordinate system.
Transact-SQL in SQL Server 2008 : Sparse Columns
SQL Server 2008 provides a new space-saving storage option referred to as sparse columns. Sparse columns can provide optimized and efficient storage for columns that contain predominately NULL values.
SQL Server 2005 : Beyond OWC: Full-On OLAP Development (part 4) - Analysis Services CLR Support: Server-Side ADO MD.NET
Unlike SQL CLR integration, Analysis Services CLR support is on by default. In fact, it cannot be disabled. However, only users with administrative permissions on the Analysis Services server or database may load CLR assemblies.
SQL Server 2005 : Beyond OWC: Full-On OLAP Development (part 3) - XMLA at Your Service
Although XMLA can be used as a true Web service (and before the SQL Server 2005 release of Analysis Services, it had to be), its elevation to native API status changes things a bit.
SQL Server 2005 : Beyond OWC: Full-On OLAP Development (part 2) - OLAP Development with ADO MD.NET
With the introduction of SQL Server Analysis Services 2005, this kind of programming is almost as easy as data access programming against relational databases. That’s because Microsoft has created an ADO.NET managed data provider called ADO MD.NET, which you can use against Analysis Services databases.
SQL Server 2005 : Beyond OWC: Full-On OLAP Development (part 1) - Management Studio as an MDX Client
Management Studio is a replacement not only for SQL Enterprise Manager and SQL Query Analyzer but also for the SQL Server 2000 Analysis Services tools: Analysis Manager and the MDX Sample Application.
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 : Using FILESTREAM Storage (part 2) - Using FILESTREAM Storage for Data Columns
Once FILESTREAM storage is enabled for a database, you can specify the FILESTREAM attribute on a varbinary(max) column to indicate that a column should store data in the FILESTREAM filegroup on the file system.
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 : Using FILESTREAM Storage (part 1) - Enabling FILESTREAM Storage
If you decide to use FILESTREAM storage, it first needs to be enabled at both the Windows level as well as at the SQL Server Instance level. FILESTREAM storage can be enabled automatically during SQL Server installation or manually after installation.
SQL Server 2005 : Using Excel (part 2) - Using PivotTables and Charts in Applications and Web Pages
Although the temptation to use Excel as your OLAP front end is compelling, such a client environment is a far cry from a true custom-developed application. Many developers will greatly prefer to host PivotTables within applications rather than ceding control of OLAP functionality to Excel.
SQL Server 2005 : Using Excel (part 1) - Working Within Excel
The techniques described in this section require that MSQuery, an Excel installation option, be installed on your PC. If it is not, Excel will ask you at a certain point if you want to install it. When asked, you should answer Yes and supply your Office installation media if prompted.
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 : Hierarchyid Data Type (part 2) - Modifying the Hierarchy
The script in Listing 2 performs the initial population of the Parts_hierarchy table. What if you need to add additional records into the table? Let’s look at how to use the GetDescendant method to add new records at different levels of the hierarchy.
Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 : Hierarchyid Data Type (part 1) - Creating a Hierarchy, Populating the Hierarchy, Querying the Hierarchy
The Hierarchyid data type introduced in SQL Server 2008 is actually a system-supplied common language runtime (CLR) user-defined type (UDT) that can be used for storing and manipulating hierarchical structures (for example, parent-child relationships) in a relational database.
Using SQL Server 2005 Integration Services : Extensibility (part 4) - Custom Connection Managers
Integration Services supports the notion of pluggable connection manager components. If you build and register a connection manager component, it will appear in the list of available connection types when you right-click in the Connection Managers tray and choose New Connection.
Using SQL Server 2005 Integration Services : Extensibility (part 3) - Script Components
The script component is one of the easiest ways to extend the functionality of the data flow. It allows access to the data flow using script written in Visual Basic .NET. When should you use a script component instead of a custom component?
Using SQL Server 2005 Integration Services : Extensibility (part 2) - Custom Components
Writing custom components is one way to extend the functionality of the data flow task. In a sense, all components are custom components, even the ones that ship with Integration Services, which shows how flexible and powerful custom components can be.
Using SQL Server 2005 Integration Services : Extensibility (part 1) - Script Tasks
A Script Task is a very simple way to introduce custom code into the execution of a package. It does not require building separate components—the code for the Script Task is stored inside the package and compiled on demand before execution.
 
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