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Exchange Server 2007 Management and Maintenance Practices : Proper Care and Feeding of Exchange Server 2007
This section is not about how to perform common, albeit necessary, management tasks such as using the interface to add a database. Instead, it focuses on concepts such as identifying and working with the server’s functional roles in the network environment, auditing network activity and usage, and monitoring the health and performance of your messaging system.
Windows 7 : Programming Plug and Play and Power Management - Callbacks for Power-Up and Power-Down , Callback for Wake Signal Support
Drivers implement the EvtDeviceDOEntry and EvtDeviceDOExit callbacks to be notified when the device enters and exits the working state, respectively.
Windows 7 : Programming Plug and Play and Power Management - Managing Power Policy
The driver also sets a 60-second idle time-out, which indicates that the framework will attempt to put the device in a low-power state when it has been idle for more than 60 seconds.
Windows 7 : Programming Plug and Play and Power Management - Registering Callbacks
Plug and Play and power events are defined for the device object, so the driver must register them in its EvtDriverDeviceAdd callback when it creates the device object.
Parallel Programming with Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Using the MapReduce Pattern (part 2)
Shakespeare is timeless. He also tends to use many of the same words in his various works. This makes Shakespeare ideal for a word count example. In addition, this section will provide a more complete demonstration of using the MapReduce class.
Parallel Programming with Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Using the MapReduce Pattern (part 1)
MapReduce is a well-known pattern introduced in 2004 in a paper titled “MapReduce: Simplified Data Processing on Large Clusters” by Jeffrey Dean and Sanjay Ghemawat
Parallel Programming with Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Data Parallelism - Reduction
Reduction reduces a collection to a value. For example, you could calculate the sum of a collection of values. Look at the following loop. The dependency is the scalar variable, which is shared between tasks.
NET Debugging : Visual Studio (part 3) - Visual Studio 2010
With the imminent release of Visual Studio 2010, debug aficionados will be happy to learn that the Visual Studio team has invested many resources in plugging some of the gaps that have existed in prior versions.
NET Debugging : Visual Studio (part 2) - .NET Framework Source-Level Debugging
Any given .NET application typically utilizes a number of different types defined in the .NET frameworks. Types can range from simple data types to complex Web service bindings, and abstracts much of the underlying complexity associated with using the technology directly.
NET Debugging : Visual Studio (part 1) - SOS Integration
To illustrate how the SOS debugger extension can be integrated into Visual Studio, start by creating a simple C# project (command-line application will suffice). After the project has been created, set a breakpoint on the first line of code and start debugging by pressing F5.
System Center Configuration Manager 2007 : Creating Packages (part 3) - About Packages, Programs, Collections, Distribution Points, and Advertisements
Having discussed software packaging in ConfigMgr, compared it with software packaging outside ConfigMgr, and compared ConfigMgr software distribution with GPO-based software distribution, it is now time to begin delving into how ConfigMgr works.
System Center Configuration Manager 2007 : Creating Packages (part 2) - Comparing GPO-based Software Distribution to ConfigMgr Software Distribution
Active Directory provides a significant amount of functionality through group policy, including the ability to distribute software.
System Center Configuration Manager 2007 : Creating Packages (part 1)
In general, packages are used to install software on systems. You can also use packages to execute just a command on a system, without installing any software.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Configuration and Security - Security Framework (part 3) - Security Coding
In this section we cover the Trustworthy Computing features of Dynamics AX, focusing on how they affect security coding. We describe table permissions, code access security, impersonation in batch execution, and the best practice rules for ensuring deployment-wide compliance.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Configuration and Security - Security Framework (part 2) - Applying Security
Configuring the security of a Dynamics AX application involves the use of domains. A domain is a collection of one or more company accounts that allow you to define user groups with the same permissions in a company with several subsidiary businesses, while allowing the same user groups to have other permissions within other companies.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Configuration and Security - Security Framework (part 1)
The security framework within Dynamics AX uses Integrated Windows authentication and Active Directory to authenticate user and system interactions before they are authorized by the Dynamics AX security framework. Using Integrated Windows authentication allows automatic logon to the Dynamics AX application without collecting user name and password information.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Configuration and Security - Licensing and Configuration
Dynamics AX allows licensing of application modules, multiple user types, languages, server technology, the Web framework, database logging, record level security, development tools, run-time execution, and integration frameworks.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Configuration and Security - IntelliMorph
Although Dynamics AX is an international product with support for multiple countries, languages, company sizes, and industries within the same deployment, it is also a productive development platform that ensures a uniform yet very configurable and automatically arranged layout of application functionality.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Reflection APIs (part 3) - Treenodes API
The two reflection APIs discussed so far both have limitations. The table data API can reflect only on the existence of elements and a small subset of element metadata. The dictionary API can reflect in a type-safe manner but only on the element types that are exposed through this API.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Reflection APIs (part 2) - Dictionary API
The dictionary API is a type-safe reflection API that can reflect on many elements. The following code sample is a revision of the preceding example that finds inventory classes by using the dictionary API.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Reflection APIs (part 1) - Table Data API
Suppose that you want to find all classes whose names begin with Invent and that have been modified within the last month. The following example shows one way to conduct your search.
Microsoft Dynamic AX 2009 : Reflection System Functions
The X++ language features a set of system functions that can be used to reflect on elements. They are described in the following sections.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - Diving in With Some Simple Examples (part 4)
The Validation block allows you to add validation attributes to the parameters of methods defined in your WCF service contract, and have the values of these automatically validated each time the method is invoked by a client.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - Diving in With Some Simple Examples (part 3)
You can create an instance of any of the validators included in the Validation block directly in your code, and then call its Validate method to validate an object or value.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - Diving in With Some Simple Examples (part 2)
The example application contains two classes that contain validation attributes and a self-validation method. The AttributedProduct class contains Validation block attributes, while the AnnotatedProduct class contains data annotation attributes.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - Diving in With Some Simple Examples (part 1)
The most common scenario when using the Validation block is to validate an instance of a class in your application. The Validation block uses the combination of rules defined in a rule set and validators added as attributes to test the values of members of the class, and the result of executing any self-validation methods within the class.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - How Do I Use The Validation Block?
In this section, we cover three topics that you should be familiar with when you start to use the block in your applications: preparing your application to use the block, choosing a suitable approach for validation, the options available for creating validators, accessing and displaying validation errors, and understanding how you can use template tokens in validation messages.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - What Does the Validation Block Do? (part 2)
Self-validation might sound as though you should be congratulating yourself on your attractiveness and wisdom, and your status as fine and upstanding citizen. However, in Enterprise Library terms, self-validation is concerned with the use of classes that contain their own validation logic.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : Banishing Validation Complication - What Does the Validation Block Do? (part 1)
Validators implement functionality for validating Microsoft® .NET Framework data types. The validators included with the Validation block fall into three broad categories: value validators, composite validators, and type (object) validators.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : A Cache Advance for Your Applications - How Do I Use the Caching Block (part 4) - Refreshing the Cache, Loading the Cache
So far, when we used the Add method to add items to the cache, we passed a null value for the refreshAction parameter. You can use this parameter to detect when an item is removed from the cache, and discover the value of that item and the reason it was removed.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : A Cache Advance for Your Applications - How Do I Use the Caching Block (part 3) - Removing Items from and Flushing the Cache
The example, Remove and flush cached items, actually demonstrates more than just removing and flushing items—it shows how you can use a dependency to remove related items from your cache, how to create extended time expirations, and how to use an array of expirations.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : A Cache Advance for Your Applications - How Do I Use the Caching Block (part 2)
By default, the Caching block does not encrypt the data that it stores in memory or in a persistent backing store. However, you can configure the block to use an encryption provider that will encrypt the data that the cache manager stores in the backing store—but be aware that data in the in-memory cache is never encrypted.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : A Cache Advance for Your Applications - How Do I Use the Caching Block (part 1) - Adding Items to and Retrieving Items from the Cache
To add an item to the cache, you can use the simple approach of specifying just the key for the item and the value to cache as parameters to the Add method. The item is cached with a never expired lifetime, and normal priority.
Microsoft Enterprise Library : A Cache Advance for Your Applications - How Do I Configure the Caching Block?
Like all of the Enterprise Library application blocks, you start by configuring your application to use the block To configure the Caching block, you add the Caching Settings section to the tool, which adds a default cache manager.
Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Data Parallelism - Unrolling Sequential Loops into Parallel Tasks (part 4) - Handling Exceptions
The following code demonstrates the proper technique to handle an unhanded exception that occurs within a parallel loop. The code purposely raises an unhandled exception in the fourth task.
Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Data Parallelism - Unrolling Sequential Loops into Parallel Tasks (part 3) - Interrupting a Loop
The break statement interrupts the current iteration and cancels any remaining loop iterations. The continue statement skips the balance of the current iteration but continues with the remaining iterations.
Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Data Parallelism - Unrolling Sequential Loops into Parallel Tasks (part 2) - The Parallel For Loop
In most programming languages, the for loop is the most commonly used statement for iterations. The following example is a serial for loop, which performs each iteration in sequence.
Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Data Parallelism - Unrolling Sequential Loops into Parallel Tasks (part 1)
Data parallelism typically begins by unrolling a sequential loop. For example, the code below defines a loop that runs sequentially. In this example, the code iterates over the loop body 100 times.
Programming Windows Services with Microsoft Visual Basic 2008 : Implementing the Worker Class, Creating the FileWorkerOptions Class
We need to add a collection to the service that can hold the number of worker class instances we plan to create. As shown in Listing 1, we will create five worker threads. This number is simply for example purposes and could easily change on a dynamic basis, which I will demonstrate shortly.
Programming Windows Services with Microsoft Visual Basic 2008 : Extending the Threading Model
The threads need access to the parameters and properties of file locations and file types. To simplify this process, we’ll create a class that we’ll use to create an instance of the worker thread.
 
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