programming4us
programming4us
HARDWARE

Build Your Own Mini-ITX Marvel (Part 3)

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
4/18/2014 11:46:42 AM
y lang=EN-GB>

Build Your Own Mini-ITX Marvel (Part 3)

With your components chosen, it’s time to get building

14. RAM-ing speed

In the BIOS, check that the CPU temperature is normal (anything below 40-50ºC) and make sure the storage drive is now visible and set as the primary boot option. It’s also worth nipping in to check the RAM settings and get the sticks running at their rated frequency using the relevant profiles. Save your BIOS settings, exit and boot from your OS installation media, and you’ll be gaming in miniature in no time.

15. OS install

With small form factor rigs you’re unlikely to have an optical drive to install your operating system from, so you’ll need to create a USB install on another PC. We’ve created an easy guide to making a Windows 8.1 install, but if you’re brave (and haven’t bought a second Windows licence) you can download an ISO version of SteamOS that can be booted from USB. Alternatively, just go for a straight Linux install.

Just go for a straight Linux install.

16. Boot and go

 With your chosen USB media attached, boot from it via the BIOS and go through the setup procedure. Once this is completed, the most important thing will be to make sure that you have web connectivity. Windows is pretty good at getting that set up, but you may have to navigate to your mobo’s download page to get the latest drivers on another machine first. Download and install them on your new rig and you’ll be up and running.

The micro machine alternative

As we’ve shown, there are many ways to build a small form factor gaming rig. Whether you’re running a chunkier chassis with a discrete GPU or relying on AMD’s latest APU’s integrated graphics, gaming on a little PC is most certainly possible. But gaming natively on a mini rig isn’t the only way to roll. With the advent of Valve’s In-Home Streaming service, even a really low-powered little client device becomes capable of impressive feats of gaming.

AMD’s latest APU’s integrated graphics

Devices like the BRIX from Gigabyte, Intel’s NUC and Zotac’s ZBox are all incredibly small machines – smaller than your router – with enough power in them to comfortably decode the game stream from a more powerful gaming rig. We’ve been playing DayZ on an Ivy Bridge generation i5 BRIX, running the free SteamOS to keep costs down. That’s the only sticking point though: these wee barebones units don’t come cheap. You’re looking at around $500 for the base unit (chassis, CPU and mobo) and then another $250-odd on mSATA storage and memory. This is where SteamOS makes sense; having a free operating system that’s still compatible with streamed Windows games saves a good chunk of cash on a setup.

But although they are undoubtedly pricey little things, they’re also smaller than pretty much anything you can put together yourself. Of course you can purchase NUC motherboards and compatible chassis separately yourself, but that doesn’t represent much of a saving – if any – over buying a barebones set.

Ivy Bridge generation i5 BRIX

This sort of micro machine, though, is the most compact gaming console around. Connect a wireless controller, and with Big Picture Mode on your telly and your big rig humming away somewhere else, you’ll be comfortably PC gaming in your living room from on your sofa. We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again – the PC is the most versatile gaming system the world has ever known.

 

 

Other  
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
REVIEW
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
programming4us
 
 
programming4us