programming4us
programming4us
MULTIMEDIA

Run Retro Games On Phone, Tablet And PC (Part 2)

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
5/13/2014 5:08:28 PM

Modern technology is all very well, but old-school entertainment still has its charms. Dave Stevenson takes a step back in time.

Emulating older hardware

If, for whatever reason, you can’t play the game on its original hardware or in a ported form, it’s time to turn to an emulator - a program that emulates older hardware, allowing the original game code to run on a modern device.

Emulator software is available for all sorts of devices, but some make better emulation platforms than others. Android users, for example, will find plenty of emulators for old games consoles in Google Play, or distributed as APKs from enthusiast websites. Unfortunately, the running-and-jumping mechanics of classic platformers don’t translate perfectly to a touchscreen, and the complex combinations of an old-school beat-‘em-up present real problems. To make things a bit easier, many emulators allow you to choose where controls are displayed, and let you configure what happens if you mash multiple buttons at once.

plenty of emulators for old games consoles in Google Play

Plenty of emulators for old games consoles in Google Play

You can also get dedicated controller accessories for mobile devices, although this obviously compromises the portability of a tablet or smartphone.

If you’re going to run an emulator, therefore, we recommend doing so on your PC. There’s a wider choice of physical controls on offer, and more power to ensure everything runs smoothly. You’re also less likely to run into problems with mismatched screen sizes.

There’s more choice, too. The emulator scene on the desktop PC is well established: you name a hardware platform and there will be a developer who claims to have a working emulator for it. The range includes arcade cabinets - see our walkthrough opposite and modern consoles as well, although we’ll focus on older systems here, not least because emulating newer platforms places significant demands on even high-end PC hardware.

If you’re going to run an emulator, therefore, we recommend doing so on your PC

If you’re going to run an emulator, therefore, we recommend doing so on your PC

There’s even an emulator for old MS-DOS systems, called DOSBox. You might not think such a thing would be necessary after all, the basic x86 architecture hasn’t changed in decades. However, while the core hardware of a modern PC can trace its lineage back to the 1970s, the same can’t be said for the operating system. Windows 8 incorporates all sorts of hardware abstractions and security features that were completely unknown when older games such as Quake ruled the roost.

To run older games, therefore, a DOS emulator is the answer. The multi-platform DOSBox is a supremely lightweight piece of software - the download is less than 2MB -that recreates a DOS 5 environment, complete with built-in support for mouse, CD and SoundBlaster hardware, and allows you to mount a directory on the host PC as a hard disk. From there, you can reacquaint yourself with DOS prompt commands (type “help/all” in DOSBox to see what’s available), and install compatible software.

To run older games, therefore, a DOS emulator is the answer

To run older games, therefore, a DOS emulator is the answer

DOSBox isn’t the only way to get old PC games running: if you prefer, you can set up a virtual machine in a host such as the free VirtualBox and install MS-DOS - or a compatible operating system such as FreeDOS. This is a more complicated approach, but it has the advantage of allowing you to set things up exactly as you want them. DOSBox doesn’t offer an easy way to save local configuration, although you can create custom configuration files containing different settings, and specify which you want to load from the command line. There’s a comprehensive DOSBox wiki.

 

 

Other  
 
Top 10
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
REVIEW
- First look: Apple Watch

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 1)

- 3 Tips for Maintaining Your Cell Phone Battery (part 2)
programming4us programming4us
programming4us
 
 
programming4us