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Kodak ScanMate i940 - Cost-Effective Sheet-Fed Scanner

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12/11/2012 9:21:30 AM

Kodak’s ScanMate isn’t attractive by any means, and it doesn’t offer the fastest performance, but it’s a reasonably solid and cost-effective sheet-fed scanner, at just $330.

When closed, the Kodak’s slightly gawky shape lacks the polish of competing models; open, it’s even less attractive, all sprawling paper feed and inelegant internal design.

But we had few problems in use, and the page holder feels reasonably secure and kept sheets in place.

Kodak ScanMate i940

Kodak ScanMate i940

Kodak claims the ScanMate can handle up to 20 sheets at a time, and you’re advised not to feed it more than 500 pages per day.

The front panel can be lifted with a firm pull, should you need to get inside and fix a jam. It’s tricky to open, particularly if you have a stack of sheets loaded.

The i940 is a doddle to use at its automatic settings. Load in your documents, press Start, and you’re away. Once we’d worked out how to access it through the Windows taskbar, it was easy to get at the front-end and alter the settings.

The usual selection of file formats are supported, but no advanced file types or archive formats are available.

You can use cloud facilities to access SharePoint and EverNote. Should you want greater control over scans, the Page Perfect sections lets you play with settings such as resolution, colour and automatic straightening. It’s a little long-winded, and isn’t perhaps the most comprehensive of editors.

Most users will want to stick with a minimum resolution of 300dpi, and here the Kodak ScanMate does a very satisfactory job of creating colour.

Most users will want to stick with a minimum resolution of 300dpi, and here the Kodak ScanMate does a very satisfactory job of creating colour.

Newsoft Presto BizCard 6.0 is a capable application for converting business cards, but there’s otherwise a marked lack of software. A Mac version of this scanner, the i940M, comes with Presto PageManager and BizCard Xpress.

The Kodak isn’t the fastest model when creating searchable PDFs. Even on AC power – you can runs the i940 on most PCs using just USB power – we struggled to get above 12 pages per minute (ppm) at 150dpi when creating a 20-page document.

The Kodak performs much faster when required only to turn pages into simple JPEG images, and higher resolutions don’t have too much of an impact on speed. We created 3000dpi images at 8.2ppm.

Most users will want to stick with a minimum resolution of 300dpi, and here the Kodak ScanMate does a very satisfactory job of creating colour. In fact, it was able to show us shades that we hadn’t even noticed on the original document.

The scanner struggles at the extreme ends of the spectrum, and it doesn’t make a great job of distinguishing between slightly variety black shades. But for general magazine articles, not to mention easier subject, such as letters and bills, the Kodak works perfectly adequately at 300dpi.

Text reproduction is reasonably accurate, and most of our search words were fine. At the i940’s lower resolutions, the results are less reliable and consistent, and colour are patchier and more inaccurate.

Verdict

The Kodak ScanMate i940 is inexpensive for a business sheet-fed scanner. As such, you shouldn’t expect the fastest performance, amazing quality or a raft of features and software titles. If you just want a solid sheet-fed that can convert bills, letters or loose magazine pages, the Kodak is a cost-effective solution.

Specifications

Sheet-fed desktop scanner; 600dpi; 24 bit colour; colour duplex; 20-sheet feeder capacity; USB 2.0; 500-sheet daily duty volume; Twain/Isis/WIA-complaint; NewSoft Preto Bizcard software; 3- year warranty; 289x107x78mm (closed); 289x330x160mm (open); 1.3kg

Details

·         Price: $397.5

·         Contact: kodak.com

Verdict: 4.5/5

·         Build: 3.5/5

·         Features: 3.5/5

·         Performance: 3/5

·         Value: 4/5

 

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