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Windows Server 2003 : Implementing Software Restriction Policies (part 4) - Implementing Software Restriction Policies - Creating a Path Rule, Designating File Types
Create a path rule to prevent users from executing applications in a path you specify. If you create a path rule for an application and intend to prevent the program from running by setting the security level to Disallowed, note that a user can still run the software by copying it to another location.
Windows Server 2003 : Implementing Software Restriction Policies (part 3) - Implementing Software Restriction Policies - Creating a Certificate Rule, Creating an Internet Zone Rule
Create a certificate rule to automatically trust software from a trusted source in a domain without prompting the user or to run files in disallowed areas of your operating system. Certificate rules can be applied to scripts and Windows Installer packages. They do not apply to files with .exe or .dll filename extensions.
Windows Server 2003 : Implementing Software Restriction Policies (part 2) - Implementing Software Restriction Policies - Creating a Hash Rule
Create a hash rule to prevent a virus, Trojan horse, or other file from running on your computer. If you want others in your organization to use a hash rule to prevent a virus from running, calculate the hash of the virus using software restriction policies and e-mail the hash value to others.
Windows Server 2003 : Implementing Software Restriction Policies (part 1)
Software restriction policies should not be used as a replacement for antivirus software. Software restriction policies do not work on Windows NT 4.0 or Windows 2000 systems.
Windows Server 2003 : Troubleshooting Software Deployed with Group Policy - Software Deployment Troubleshooting Scenarios
Windows Server 2003 : Maintaining Software Deployed with Group Policy (part 2) - Removing Applications Deployed with Group Policy
There are two options for removing software deployed with Group Policy. You can immediately uninstall the software from users and computers (known as a forced removal), or you can allow users to continue to use the software but prevent new installations (known as an optional removal).
Windows Server 2003 : Maintaining Software Deployed with Group Policy (part 1) - Upgrading Applications Deployed with Group Policy
Upgrades typically involve major changes to the software and normally have new version numbers. Usually a substantial number of files change for an upgrade.
Windows 7 : Using WDS for Multicast Deployments (part 2) - Creating a Multicast Deployment
Here you can configure how IPv4 or IPv6 addresses are assigned to WDS multicast clients. By default, the WDS server will manage a predefined range of IP addresses (select the Use Addresses From The Following Range radio button).
Windows 7 : Using WDS for Multicast Deployments (part 1) - How WDS Multicast Works
The basic idea of a multicast is that a server with data (the WDS server with an installation image) will transmit data once on the network and a number of listening clients (WDS clients) receive the data.
Windows 7 : Tweaking Your WDS Server - Manage Domain Membership Using WDS
You may have noticed something to do with computer accounts while reading about client naming policy in the previous section. WDS will join to a domain the computers that it builds. You can control exactly how this is done.
Windows Server 2003 : Distributing Software with Group Policy (part 3) - Deploying Software with Group Policy
In this practice, you deploy (assign and publish) the Windows Server 2003 Administration Tools Pack with Group Policy. Installing the Administration Tools Pack on a computer that is not a domain controller allows you to administer Active Directory remotely.
Windows Server 2003 : Distributing Software with Group Policy (part 2) - Setting Windows Installer Package Properties
Some settings in the Properties dialog box for the Windows Installer package can be set at the GPO level by editing the Software Installation Properties dialog box.
Windows Server 2003 : Distributing Software with Group Policy (part 1) - Specifying Software Deployment Properties for the GPO
For example, if you use a GPO to deploy both Microsoft Office XP Professional and Microsoft FrontPage 2002, both applications can edit Spreadsheet Load Library files with the .sll extension.
Windows 7 : Tweaking Your WDS Server - Using WDS to Name Machines
WDS will use the client naming policy to configure the name of a computer as it is being built. For example, you could deploy a number of machines such as IEDBWPC001, IEDBWPC002, IEDBWPC003, and IEDBWPC004 using an IEDBWPC%03# computer naming policy.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Deploying Your First Image
Boot the target machine with the custom MDT WinPE (LiteTouch_x86.iso or LiteTouch_x86.wim) created by updating your deployment share. The MDT client wizard launches automatically and walks you through the deployment process. In this section we'll explore the default client wizard settings.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 6) - Updating the Deployment Share
Before you update the deployment share, you need to tweak it a bit. You'll modify the scratch space in WinPE to make it bigger. The reason behind this is that the scratch space is used when you inject drivers during deployment.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 5) - Creating a Task Sequence
Task sequences (TSs) drive the deployment process. The TS will determine which operating system is deployed along with which applications, drivers, and patches. The operating system, applications, drivers, and patches are each considered tasks within the deployment.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 4) - Populating the Deployment Share - Importing Drivers, Importing Packages
The drivers will appear in the Deployment Workbench folder from which you launched the Import Driver Wizard. But cut and paste works the same here as it did in the Applications and Operating Systems nodes.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 3) - Populating the Deployment Share - Importing Applications
Applications are the next component we'll cover. The folder structure you create for your applications could be department based. Computers in the Research department may need different software installed than a computer going to the Marketing department.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 2) - Populating the Deployment Share - Importing Operating Systems
After you have created a deployment share, it will appear in the Deployment Workbench, as shown in Figure 9. Under your deployment share you'll see six nodes: Applications, Operating Systems, Out-of-Box Drivers, Packages, Task Sequences, and Advanced Configuration.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Creating and Populating a Deployment Share (part 1)
You will almost certainly need two deployment shares. The first one (the lab share) is where you create reference images and the other one (the production share) is where you create real deployment shares.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Installing MDT 2010 Update 1
Once you have chosen the operating system (Server 2008 R2, we hope) for your deployment server, ensured that you have met the hardware requirements, downloaded and installed the WAIK and its associated components (if needed), and downloaded MDT 2010 Update 1 from Microsoft, you're ready to install MDT.
Windows 7 : Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2010 - Setting Up Your Deployment Server
The machine on which you install MDT will be called either a technician machine (when you're installing MDT on a desktop OS) or a deployment server (when you're installing MDT on a server class operating system).
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : GPMC Scripts - Finding GPOs Based on Parameters
Sometimes you know what you are looking for, but you are not certain which GPOs contain the information. These scripts allow you find GPOs based on general criteria.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : GPMC Scripts - GPO Reporting (part 2)
This script dumps all GPO information from all GPOs in the domain into XML and HTML files at the location you specify. The output is everything from all four tabs in the details pane of the GPMC when you click a GPO: Scope, Details, Settings, and Delegation.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : GPMC Scripts - GPO Reporting (part 1)
Whether you are auditing the environment or just documenting the GPO infrastructure, you will want to report on a variety of aspects of the GPO environment. These scripts allow you to report on individual GPOs, their settings, and the GPO environment.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : GPMC Scripts - Copying and Importing GPOs
GPMC scripts allow you to create objects, such as a new GPO or a file that will duplicate the entire GPO environment. These tasks are very powerful and excellent for disaster recovery of the GPO infrastructure. You can also perform cleanup of the GPOs by using a script that allows you to delete them.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Copying and Importing GPOs
To efficiently utilize existing GPOs and their settings, you can use the copy and import features within the GPMC and the following scripts. The copy option allows a company to move GPOs efficiently from a test domain to a production domain, without having to manually duplicate the settings from one environment to the other.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Backing Up and Restoring GPOs (part 2)
This script restores all GPOs from the backup location. If you have archived numerous GPOs in the backup location for a single GPO, the script will restore only the most recent backup for each GPO. If you do not specify a domain, the restore occurs in the current domain.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Backing Up and Restoring GPOs (part 1)
Whether you want to back up a single GPO or the entire group of GPOs for the domain, there are scripts to handle these tasks. Not only can you back up GPOs, you can also use the script to restore them. Other scripts allow you to see the backup location where the GPOs have been archived.
Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Creating Custom Alerts - Creating an Alert for a Stopped Service, Custom Alert for Backup Failure
Of course, one size never fits all. You can create a custom alert that adds alert information to reports and enables users to receive email notifications when the specified event occurs. The custom alert provides information about a specific event that has occurred, which will enable a system administrator to quickly correct a problem.
Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Configuring Alerts - Alerts for Services, Performance Counter Alert, Event Log Error Alerts
Windows SBS includes a large set of alerts. To view the alerts, click Network in the Windows SBS Console and then select Computers. In the Tasks pane, click View Notification Settings.
Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Network Reports (part 2) - Customizing the Detailed Network Report
Using the same format as the Summary and Detailed reports, you can build a new report to suit your specific needs. For example, let’s say you outsource certain administrative tasks and want to send a regular security report to the person who handles it.
Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Network Reports (part 1) - Customizing the Summary Report
The default Summary Network Report really doesn’t tell you much more than you can see on the Home page of the Windows SBS Console. However, you can easily customize it to display selected reports on network health.
Windows 8 : Diagnosis and Recovery - Windows Recovery Environment
Refresh will solve most of your computer’s woes automatically. But you may run into situations where Refresh doesn’t work and you don’t want to start over or revert to a system image.
Windows 8 : Diagnosis and Recovery - Refresh and Reset
Consumers have gotten used to the idea that when their phone or tablet misbehaves, all they have to do is unfold a paper clip, stick it in a tiny hole, and wait four seconds, and their device will reset to a factory state.
Windows 8 : Diagnosis and Recovery - The Startup, Users, Details, and Services Tabs
The Startup tab maintains a list of the applications that automatically launch when you start your system . Note that applications you launch after your system starts up are not included in this list. The list shows the amount of resources that the app consumes.
Windows Server 2008 R2 networking : Network Monitoring and Troubleshooting Utilities
Ping, PathPing, and NSLookup are great tools to assist with testing and troubleshooting Windows networks. Brief examples of using each are provided below.
Windows Server 2008 R2 networking : Planning and Deploying DHCP (part 2) - Deploying DHCP
DHCP is installed by adding the DHCP role in Server Manager. The initial set up process will install the DHCP components and will take you through the initial configuration of the DHCP server.
Windows Server 2008 R2 networking : Planning and Deploying DHCP (part 1) - Planning for DHCP
Like DNS, DHCP is considered one of the most critical services on Windows network. If DHCP fails, then the client computers do not receive IP addresses and thus they cannot communicate on the IP network.
 
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