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Windows 8 : Configuring, managing, and troubleshooting connections (part 1) - Troubleshooting network problems
Microsoft has built solid troubleshooting utilities over the years, and the general tools built into Windows 8 have made the client experience of repairing network connections straightforward for most users.
Windows 8 : Configuring and using Remote Desktop (part 3) - Programs, Experience, Advanced
The Programs tab, shown in Figure 6, gives you the option of starting a specific program when a remote session is initiated. Select the Start The Following Program On Connection check box, and then provide the path and file name of the application you want to start.
Windows 8 : Configuring and using Remote Desktop (part 2) - Opening the Remote Desktop application - General, Display, Local Resources
Display Configuration You can set the size of the screen, from small to large, when you connect, with large being full-screen. You can also set this connection to use all the monitors connected to your system by selecting the Use All My Monitors For The Remote Session check box.
Windows 8 : Configuring and using Remote Desktop (part 1) - Configuring Remote Desktop
Before you can use Remote Desktop on a system, it has to be enabled, and the users who will have access to this method of connection must be selected.
Windows 8 : Working with Remote Assistance - Initiating Remote Assistance, Providing remote assistance
Remote Assistance sessions must be initiated by the person requesting help. Although you might walk the user through the process over the phone, through instant messaging, or even email, the person requesting your help must take the steps to start a session.
Windows 8 : Managing authorization and access rights (part 4) - Run As,Using and managing certificates
Windows has supported the execution of applications or services using alternate credentials for many versions. With the introduction of UAC, the ability to elevate tasks to run as another user or as the local administrator is required when the currently signed-in user does not have the authority to perform a task.
Windows 8 : Managing authorization and access rights (part 3) - Running tasks as administrator and user account control
When working with Windows 8, it might be necessary to impersonate another user, usually the administrator account, to perform a task. Prior to user account control (UAC), many applications relied on administrative credentials and privileges to perform their tasks.
Windows 8 : Managing authorization and access rights (part 2) - Local Security Policy console
In addition to user rights assignment, security settings for Windows can be configured within the Local Security Policy console. Table 2 lists and defines the available security options in Windows 8.
Windows 8 : Managing authorization and access rights (part 1) - Assigning user rights
Within Windows 8, local security policy items affect what can happen on a local computer. Computers joined to an Active Directory domain process security from Active Directory before evaluating items at the local policy level. Assigning user rights is performed at both the local and domain levels.
Windows 8 : Determining who’s who through authentication (part 5) - Logging on by using a picture password,Using a personal identification number for authentication
Windows 8 supports the use of picture passwords for authentication. To create a picture password, you select a picture and associate some gestures with it that are then used to sign in to Windows.
Windows 8 : Determining who’s who through authentication (part 4) - Managing credentials in Windows 8 by using Credential Manager,Configuring a Microsoft account for use with Windows
As the number of computers and other connected devices increases, the number of passwords and access credentials will also increase. The Credential Manager utility with Windows 8 aids in storing all these user names, passwords, and other identities you use.
Windows 8 : Determining who’s who through authentication (part 3) - Smart card authentication, Biometric authentication
A smart card is a hardware token that contains certificates that prove the identity of the person using a device. Using a smart card authentication requires an organization to provide each user with a smart card, which can be tied to an identification badge or other item, and to attach a smart card reader to each computer within the environment.
Windows 8 : Determining who’s who through authentication (part 2) - User name and password-based authentication
When an employee signs in to a computer joined to a domain, Windows passes the request to a domain controller, which checks the credentials provided against the domain’s list of user accounts.
Windows 8 : Determining who’s who through authentication (part 1) - How does Windows authenticate users accessing the system?
Windows asks you to click a picture or perform another action to sign in, such as pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete. You then type a user name and password or select another means of authentication to prove your identity to Windows.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 9) - Configuring WMI filtering
Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) filtering allows the scope of a GPO to be dynamically determined based on attributes of the target computer.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 8) - Managing GPO links, Configuring security filtering
GPOs can be linked to OUs, sites, or domains. Figure 7 shows the HQ-Desktops GPO selected in the console tree of the GPMC.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 7) - Viewing infrastructure status, Creating GPOs
A new feature of the GPMC in Windows Server 2012 is the Status tab shown in Figure 6, which provides information about the status of Active Directory and SYSVOL replication.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 6) - Advanced Audit Policy Configuration
One new type of advanced audit policy (Audit Removable Storage) is shown in Figure 5. This new policy provides you with the ability to track the usage of removable storage devices.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 5) - User Rights Assignment, Security Options
You can also specify who should have rights to perform critical administrative tasks, such as backing up and restoring files and directories, taking ownership of files and objects, and forcing the shutdown from a remote computer.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 4) - Refreshing Group Policy
In previous versions of Windows, if you wanted to force a refresh of Group Policy for a computer, you had to run the Gpupdate.exe command locally on the computer targeted by the GPO.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 3) - Configuring a central store, Using Starter GPOs
Starter GPOs are basically templates you can use for quickly creating preconfigured GPOs. By creating and configuring a suitable collection of Starter GPOs, you can significantly accelerate the process of implementing Group Policy within a large, distributed environment.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 2) - Group Policy and Active Directory design
Group Policy delivers and enforces policies to targeted objects such as users and computers by creating GPOs and linking them to Active Directory domains, OUs, or sites that contain these objects.
Windows Server 2012 : Planning, implementing, and managing Group Policy (part 1) - Understanding policies vs. preferences
Before you implement Group Policy in your Active Directory environment, you need to understand the difference between policies and preferences.
Windows 8 : Monitoring, optimizing, and troubleshooting system health and performance (part 5) - Monitoring system resources by using Performance Monitor
For monitoring system performance, nothing is better than the Performance Monitor tool. Built into Windows from the beginning, the Performance Monitor tool enables administrators to glean deep insight into how even the most granular aspects of the computer are running.
Windows 8 : Monitoring, optimizing, and troubleshooting system health and performance (part 4) - Configuring and analyzing event logs
The operating system and many applications use the event log in Windows to record various activities. The event log is a busy place; it’s not uncommon to see hundreds or thousands of new entries written to the various Windows event logs, depending on what is happening with the computer.
Windows 8 : Monitoring, optimizing, and troubleshooting system health and performance (part 3) - Using Windows Action Center
In Figure 7, note the flag with the little red X on it. You might see a similar flag on your own Windows 8 system, with or without the red X. This flag denotes the current status of the machine as viewed by the Windows Action Center.
Windows 8 : Monitoring, optimizing, and troubleshooting system health and performance (part 2) - App history, Startup, Services
App history is a new concept in Windows 8 and was introduced to provide administrators with insight into how Windows 8 native applications are running. The App History tab is shown in Figure 3.
Windows 8 : Monitoring, optimizing, and troubleshooting system health and performance (part 1) - Processes, Performance
The Processes tab provides you with a single location from which to view all the software running on the system, down to the application and even document or instance level.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Common GPO Troubleshooting Tools (part 3) - GPResult, GPOTool
This tool reports the final settings applied from the GPOs on the local computer and from Active Directory. The tool works in conjunction with the RSoP tool.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Common GPO Troubleshooting Tools (part 2) - GPMC
The Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) provides numerous tools and features that help with the troubleshooting of Group Policy.Table 1 lists many issues that arise with Group Policy.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Common GPO Troubleshooting Tools (part 1) - GPLogView
If you need to archive Group Policy logs or troubleshoot a computer in a remote location, it might be easier to do so using a text output of the log, instead of trying to use Event Viewer.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Using Event Logging for Troubleshooting (part 4) - Summary of Group Policy Event IDs
Each event recorded with the GroupPolicy source name can be categorized into one of many ranges of related events. These ranges help you determine start, end, success, failure, and so on for each event. Table 5 summarizes each event ID range.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Using Event Logging for Troubleshooting (part 3) - Divide the Custom View of the Log into Three Phases
This phase begins the Group Policy processing and gathers information that is required to process Group Policy. The information gathered in this phase is used to cycle through each Group Policy extension.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Using Event Logging for Troubleshooting (part 2)
To take full advantage of the new Event Viewer features and capabilities, it is a best practice to follow a set procedure to ensure that you are viewing the most relevant information for the problem that you are having.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Using Event Logging for Troubleshooting (part 1) - Group Policy Operational Log
The primary location for storage of Group Policy events is in the Group Policy operational log. As stated earlier, this is where the past Userenv text file event logging is stored.
Windows 8 : Managing Windows Update (part 4) - Viewing update history, Rolling back updates
The information provided as part of the update history can help you if you find that you’ve deployed an update that needs to be rolled back or otherwise removed from a system.
Windows 8 : Managing Windows Update (part 3) - Managing Windows Update in Windows 8 native interface
The Windows 8 native interface does not expose all the Windows Update settings that you have seen up to this point. Instead, the Windows 8 native view of Windows Update provides you with just the critical subset of Windows Update functionality that is necessary to perform updates.
Windows 8 : Managing Windows Update (part 2) - Configuring update settings
To make changes to your existing Windows Update settings, open Windows Update and tap or click Change Settings on the left side of the screen (see Figure 3). This action opens the window you see in Figure 4, in which you can make changes to how Windows Update operates.
Windows 8 : Managing Windows Update (part 1) - Accessing Windows Update settings by using Control Panel
The process for configuring Windows Update in Windows 8 has not changed dramatically from the process found in earlier versions of Windows, but the new Windows 8 interface changes the method by which you access Windows Update settings.
Windows 8 : Working with location-based settings and connection methods
Windows 8 has Wi-Fi Direct built in. When another device that supports Wi-Fi Direct, such as a television, appears within range, the device can be added to Windows in the same way a Bluetooth keyboard or USB scanner is added.
 
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