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Windows Server 2008 R2 Powershell Cmdlets (part 4) - Group Policy cmdlets
The Group Policy cmdlets in PowerShell follow in the footsteps of all the other cmdlets in raw power. They let you do almost anything you could normally do with the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) using cmdlets. But just like many of the other new features in PowerShell 2.0, the cmdlets are not available from the start.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Powershell Cmdlets (part 3) - Failover Cluster cmdlets
A PowerShell window will then open and start importing the modules you will need. To verify that it worked, you can type Get-Command –Module FailOverClusters and hit enter. If you did everything properly, you will see the cmdlet list for FailOverClusters.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Powershell Cmdlets (part 2) - AppLocker cmdlets
This section will cover the AppLocker cmdlets that can be used to manage AppLocker policies in Windows Server 2008 R2. AppLocker is a new Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 feature that helps the administrator control how users can access and use files.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Powershell Cmdlets (part 1) - Active Directory cmdlets
The PowerShell Active Directory module introduces over 70 cmdlets to provide full support for almost any Active Directory function an administrator might require. But before you can use this newfound power, you either have to import the module or use the Active Directory Module for PowerShell.
Windows Server 2008 R2 : PowerShell V2 feature focus - Installing Powershell, Introduction to Powershell Scripting
The mere mention of the word “scripting” sends many brave administrators running for the hills. Brave souls immediately pick up the phone and call their programmer friend. It does not have to be this way. PowerShell scripting is easy to grasp.
Windows Server 2008 R2 : PowerShell V2 feature focus - Introduction to Powershell
To start at the very beginning, we answer the most basic question, “What is PowerShell?” PowerShell is a command-based shell and scripting language built on the .NET framework with incredible power and versatility designed especially for system administration.
Installing Windows 8 on startup VHD files (part 3) - Starting the system from the VHD, Removing VHD installations
Windows needed to be reminded that there were multiple installations from which to choose—some located on physical drives in traditional installations and others located inside VHD files.
Installing Windows 8 on startup VHD files (part 2) - Creating the VHD during the installation by using DiskPart
This section discusses another installation to VHD. This time, the VHD file will be created as part of the installation process by using the DiskPart utility. This can save time during the process because the existing operating system does not need to be started to create the VHD file.
Installing Windows 8 on startup VHD files (part 1) - Creating a VHD from an existing installation
As part of the following procedure, the DiskPart command-line utility will be used when the installation of Windows 8 gets underway to attach the virtual hard disk file to your computer to be detected by Windows.
Windows 8 : Upgrading or migrating from a previous version of Windows (part 4) - Migrating user data
Consider an example in which you have a shared computer that the marketing department uses for interns who need to access the Internet. The computer is not connected to the domain, but it has a network connection.
Windows 8 : Upgrading or migrating from a previous version of Windows (part 3) - Using an external hard disk or USB flash drive, Using the User State Migration Tool
Another way to get information from one computer to another is by using the User State Migration Tool (USMT). This tool is useful for large migrations such as moving many computers during an upgrade.
Windows 8 : Upgrading or migrating from a previous version of Windows (part 2) - Using removable media, Using a network connection
You can start from either your current computer or your new Windows 8–based computer. First, search for the Windows Easy Transfer tool. You begin your search from the Start menu on your current computer or from the Start screen on your Windows 8–based computer.
Windows 8 : Upgrading or migrating from a previous version of Windows (part 1) - Running the Setup Wizard , Configuring your account
When you insert the Windows 8 media in your computer and run Setup.exe, the initialization process begins, and the Setup Wizard guides you through the installation.
Installing Windows 8 on a new or formatted system (part 3) - Installing Windows 8 with Windows To Go
Windows To Go is a new feature in the Windows 8 Enterprise edition. It redefines the concept portability by creating a Windows 8 workspace that runs from removable media. The USB drive becomes your Windows To Go workspace.
Installing Windows 8 on a new or formatted system (part 2) - Configuring your account
After the devices have been configured, the system restarts and requests answers to some questions about configuring your account. During the final restart of the installation process, some configuration begins to initialize the computer for first use, which includes the following
Installing Windows 8 on a new or formatted system (part 1) - Starting the installation
Installing Windows 8 is similar to installing Windows 7 in that the number of tasks is kept to a minimum and much of the work occurs without user intervention. The Setup Wizard guides you through the installation.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Adjusting Screen Resolution - Change Screen Resolution
Other settings in the Control Panel affect both the Start screen and desktop. For example, you can apply higher screen resolution settings to improve the clarity of onscreen images.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Changing the Desktop Color Scheme - Change Windows Color and Transparency
Windows allows you to change the color of window borders and the taskbar. You can choose from a variety of preset colors and also enable the Transparency feature, which gives an attractive glowing effect to these desktop elements.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Changing the Desktop Background - Select a Different Background
You can choose your own background for your desktop to give it a more personalized look. Windows provides some attractive pictures along with the alternative option to use a solid color for your background, or you can use any image or photo you have available in your Pictures library.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Choosing a Desktop Theme
The appearance of the desktop is a bit more customizable than the Start screen, allowing you to select preset themes or even save your own themes based on your choice of background and color.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Putting Shortcuts on the Desktop - Create a Desktop Shortcut
You can place shortcuts on the desktop to access frequently used documents or applications. This is the desktop equivalent of pinning tiles to the Start screen. After you create a shortcut, you simply double-click the shortcut to open a document or app.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Modifying the Account Picture - Select an Account Picture
When you leave the Lock screen, you are presented with a picture and password field for any logged in user or, if nobody is currently logged in, for all users. If you assign a picture to a user account, that image will be displayed instead of a simple silhouette.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Setting Up Lock Screen Apps
By default, Windows 8 displays the date and time from the Calendar app, as well as notifications of any new messages from Messaging and Mail on your Lock screen. You can also choose to display the Weather app by using the steps in this section.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Personalizing the Lock Screen Background - Choose a Lock Screen Image
The Lock screen appears when you first start your computer, when you put it to sleep using the Power setting, or when your computer goes to sleep after a period of inactivity.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Appearance of Windows - Changing the Start Screen Background and Color
Although you can’t display pictures as backgrounds for the Start screen as you could in previous versions of Windows, you can choose a background pattern and color that appeals to you. It’s a simple procedure to select your background and color from several preset selections.
Windows 8 : Modifying Tiles on the Start Screen - Change Tile Size,Move Tiles in Start Screen
You might have noticed that tiles on the Start screen come in different sizes. Some are larger, such as Weather; others are smaller. Certain tiles can be made smaller or larger.
Windows 8 : Customizing the Start Screen - Pin an App,Unpin an App
The Start screen is your new home screen in Windows 8. It is similar to the Windows Mobile operating system interface used in some smartphones and tablets.
Windows Server 2008 : Troubleshooting Replication (part 3) - Migrating to DFSR with dfsrmig
The dfsrmig tool is used to migrate the SYSVOL folder from New Technology File Replication Service (NT FRS) to Distributed File System Replication (DFSR). FRS was the first method, and it was used in all AD domains by default up to and including Windows Server 2008.
Windows Server 2008 : Troubleshooting Replication (part 2) - Forcing Replication with repadmin
If you are having problems with replication and cannot force replication, check DNS. One important check is to ensure that DNS has created SRV records. You can stop and restart the netlogon service to re-create SRV records with the net stop netlogon and net start netlogon commands.
Windows Server 2008 : Troubleshooting Replication (part 1) - Checking Replication with repadmin
One of the primary command prompt commands you can use to troubleshoot Active Directory (AD) replication issues is repadmin. It’s available on DC, and you can use it to view replication data, force replication events, and manually create the replication topology if things really go wrong.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Group Policy Preferences: Control Panel Settings (part 2)
The Network Options preference provides two options for you to configure. The first is VPN connections, including settings for security and connection type. The second is Dial-Up Networking (DUN) connections, including settings for the scope of users who can make a DUN connection
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Group Policy Preferences: Control Panel Settings (part 1)
The following sections describe each of the Group Policy Preferences settings that fall under the Computer Configuration and User Configuration sections. If the setting falls under only one section, that is specified. If nothing is mentioned, the setting appears under both sections.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Group Policy Preferences: Windows Settings (part 2)
The Folders preference gives the administrator control over folders that reside on the target computer. The ability to create, replace, update, and delete with custom settings makes this preference very powerful.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Group Policy Preferences: Windows Settings (part 1)
The Applications preference can be used to modify many of the Microsoft products, such as Office Word, Office PowerPoint, and Office Outlook. By default, the settings that can be configured under this node are not available.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Management and Support of Group Policy Preferences
Because Group Policy Preferences is a new technology released in the Windows Server 2008 time frame, you will find that there are limitations on which legacy operating systems can manage them.
Windows 7 : ADDING UAC SUPPORT TO YOUR APPLICATION (part 4)
Make absolutely certain that you perform this task on a closed file to ensure that your application doesn't experience an error. Performing the task on an open file can cause conflicts, especially if the file is opened for write access, which locks it.
Windows 7 : ADDING UAC SUPPORT TO YOUR APPLICATION (part 3) - Executing as a Separate Process - Creating the Secondary Project , Configuring the Secondary Project
The example begins with a Windows Forms template application named Modify Permission that has a single button, btnChange. You can give the solution and project the same name, if desired.
Windows 7 : ADDING UAC SUPPORT TO YOUR APPLICATION (part 2) - Creating a Manifest - Compiling the Manifest into the Application
In most cases, you won't use a separate manifest file . The only exception is when you're absolutely certain the administrator will need to make changes to the application manifest at some point (and even then, using a separate manifest is a dangerous proposition).
Windows 7 : ADDING UAC SUPPORT TO YOUR APPLICATION (part 1) - Creating a Manifest - Creating the Application Code
The example application adds or removes auditing from a test file, Test.TXT, that appears in the output folder. In this case, the application adds or removes auditing for the write right of the BUILTIN\Users account.
Parallels Desktop 9 For Mac - The Best Of Both Worlds
There are many reasons why an OS X user might want to run Windows on their Mac. Chiefly because there are some programs that do not have Mac versions, such as Quicken, Internet Explorer and PC games. For this reason, desktop virtualization software has been popular with a niche group of Mac users, and one of the most popular is the Parallels Desktop for Mac series.
 
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