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Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Benefits of Group Policy Preferences (part 2) - Working with Any Organizational Unit Design
All Group Policy Preferences provide the advanced targeting feature called item-level targeting. This feature allows administrators to target any Group Policy Preferences setting, on a per-setting basis, using one or more targeting criteria.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Benefits of Group Policy Preferences (part 1) - User-Friendly Interface
Group Policy Preferences are designed with administration in mind—they are not the typical Group Policy setting. Group Policy Preferences are designed with a friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that not only makes the implementation easier, but clearly identifies the purpose of each setting.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Creating Custom ADMX and ADML Files (part 4) - Using ADMX File Language
Table 5 provides a summary of all of the elements available for use in both the ADMX and ADML files. For a more in-depth view of the ADMX and ADML file syntax, refer to the syntax reference guide on the resource CD, which describes in detail each element that can be used in these files.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Creating Custom ADMX and ADML Files (part 3) - Core ADMX File Concepts
The ADMX file is responsible for creating the category and policy structure within the GPME, whereas the ADML file is responsible for the text for the category, policy, and any other elements used. Any number of ADML files can be used with a single ADMX file to create language-specific interfaces.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Creating Custom ADMX and ADML Files (part 2) - Core ADMX File Concepts
The creation of custom ADMX files can be made more efficient when you understand some of the key concepts. Here, you will see how the default ADMX files can be leveraged with your new ADMX files to ensure consistency and reduce errors within the GPME.
Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Creating Custom ADMX and ADML Files (part 1) - ADMX Schema , ADMX File Structure , ADML File Structure
The rules of ADMX and ADML file creation and syntax usage are defined in the ADMX schema. The schema is a set of three files that define the elements and attributes, how the syntax is constructed, and how the ADMX and ADML files are used in conjunction.
Windows 7 : Custom Libraries and Saved Searches (part 2) - Using Saved Searches
While Libraries are awesome for specific projects, sometimes you just want to search for certain kinds of files, regardless of where they're located, and then save this search for later use.
Windows 7 : Custom Libraries and Saved Searches (part 1) - Creating Custom Libraries
Windows 7 includes four default Libraries, each of which handles a specific content type (documents, music, pictures, and videos). These Libraries will likely offer enough diversity for most users, but power users may be interested in creating custom Libraries of their own.
Windows 7 : Visualization and Organization - How to Make the Windows Shell Work for You - The Organizational Advantage of Libraries
Arrange by provides a number of options, but what you'll see will differ according to which Library you're viewing. All of them use "Arrange by Folder" as the default choice, however, and in this arrangement, a Library will display just like any other folder.
Windows 7 : Visualization and Organization - How to Make the Windows Shell Work for You
In each Windows version, you can utilize a number of shell view styles, each of which presents the files and folders (and now, Libraries) you're looking at in a slightly different way. These view styles—and the ways in which you access and configure them—have changed again in Windows 7.
Windows 7 : Understanding Libraries (part 2) - Special Shell Folders...Now Just User Folders
We mentioned earlier that Windows 7 still sports a full collection of special shell folders, and that's true, though these folders really aren't that special anymore given the prominence of Libraries.
Windows 7 : Understanding Libraries (part 1) - Virtual Folders 101, Libraries and Windows 7
Early in the several-year development life cycle of Windows Vista, Microsoft began talking up a new file management system that would be based on a new user interface construct called a virtual folder.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 11) - Designing custom taskpads for the MMC - Creating navigation tasks, Arranging, editing, and removing tasks
Navigation tasks are used to create links from one taskpad to another or from a taskpad to a saved console view. Before you can create navigation tasks, you must save a console view or a view of a particular taskpad to the Favorites menu.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 10) - Designing custom taskpads for the MMC - Creating and managing tasks
You create tasks by using the New Task Wizard. By default, this wizard starts automatically when you finish creating a taskpad view. You can start the wizard using the taskpad Properties dialog box as well.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 9) - Designing custom taskpads for the MMC - Creating and managing taskpads
If you want to create multiple taskpads, you can repeat this procedure. For the example console, you might want to have a taskpad for each folder; in that case, you would create three additional taskpads
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 8) - Designing custom taskpads for the MMC - Getting started with taskpads, Understanding taskpad view styles
Basically, taskpads let you create a page of tasks you can perform quickly by tapping or clicking the associated shortcut links rather than using the existing menu or interface provided by snap-ins.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 7) - Building custom MMCs - Setting the console icon before saving, Saving the console tool
While you are working in the Options dialog box, you might consider setting custom icons for your console tools. All the console tools developed by Microsoft have their own icons.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 6) - Building custom MMCs - Setting the console mode before saving
When you are finished authoring the console tool, select Options on the File menu. In the Options dialog box, as shown in Figure 11, you can change the console mode so that it is ready for use.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 5) - Building custom MMCs - Adding snap-ins to the console
While you are thinking about the organization of the tool and the possibility of using additional views of the console root, you should also consider the types of snap-ins that you want to add to the console.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 4) - Building custom MMCs - Creating the console
The first step in building a custom console tool is to create the console you’ll use as the framework. To get started, open a blank MMC in author mode. Type mmc in the Search box, and then press Enter.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 3) - Using the MMC - MMC tool availability
Generally, the preconfigured MMC consoles available on a server depend on the roles, role services, and features that are installed. As you install additional roles, role services, and features, additional tools for administration are installed, and these tools can be both console tools and standard tools.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 2) - Using the MMC - MMC window and startup
The MMC window consists of the console tree, the main pane, and an optional actions pane. The left pane is the console tree. It provides a hierarchical list of nodes available in the console. At the top of the tree is the console root, which could be specifically labeled Console Root or, as with the preconfigured tools, it is simply the snap-in name.
Windows Server 2012 MMC Administration (part 1) - Using the MMC - MMC snap-ins, MMC modes
To take advantage of what the MMC framework has to offer, you add any of the available standalone snap-ins to a console. A console is simply a container for snap-ins that uses the MMC framework.
Windows Server 2003 : Designing a Server Cluster (part 3) - Creating a Server Cluster
All the computers that are to become cluster nodes must have access to the shared storage solution you have selected; you should know your applications’ capabilities with regard to partitioning; and you should have decided how to deploy them
Windows Server 2003 : Designing a Server Cluster (part 2) - Creating an Application Deployment Plan
The stateful applications that server clusters host usually have greater capabilities than the stateless applications used on Network Load Balancing clusters. This means that you have more flexibility in how you deploy the applications on the cluster.
Windows Server 2003 : Designing a Server Cluster (part 1) - Planning a Server Cluster Hardware Configuration
The computers running Windows Server 2003 that you use to build a server cluster must all use the same processor architecture, meaning that you cannot mix 32-bit and 64-bit systems in the same cluster.
Windows Server 2003 : Clustering Servers - Using Network Load Balancing (part 3) - Monitoring Network Load Balancing
Once you have created and configured your Network Load Balancing cluster, several tools included in Windows Server 2003 can be used to monitor the cluster’s ongoing processes.
Windows Server 2003 : Clustering Servers - Using Network Load Balancing (part 2) - Deploying a Network Load Balancing Cluster
If you are using a second network interface adapter for cluster traffic, at this point do not configure that adapter with the IP address you want to use to represent the cluster.
Windows Server 2003 : Clustering Servers - Using Network Load Balancing (part 1) - Planning a Network Load Balancing Deployment
The high availability provided by NLB will do you no good if your users can’t access the servers because of a failure in a router, switch, or Internet connection. In addition, because many NLB installations provide Web and other services to Internet users, you must consider the security of your cluster servers and the rest of your internal network.
Windows Server 2003 : Clustering Servers - Understanding Clustering (part 2) - Designing a Clustering Solution
The first thing to decide when you are considering a clustering solution for your network is just what you expect to realize from the cluster—in other words, know just how much availability, reliability, or scalability you need.
Windows Server 2003 : Clustering Servers - Understanding Clustering (part 1) - Clustering Types
Windows Server 2003 supports two types of clustering: server clusters and Network Load Balancing (NLB). The difference between the two types of clustering is based on the types of applications the servers must run and the nature of the data they use.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 6) - SUS Backup and Recovery,Designing a Network Security Update Infrastructure
The process described to back up the IIS metabase is useful not only for backing up SUS, but for any other Web site or application running on Windows Server 2003 and IIS 6.0.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 5) - Configuring Automatic Updates Through Group Policy , SUS Troubleshooting
The Automatic Updates client will, by default, connect to the Microsoft Windows Update server. Once you have installed SUS in your organization, you can direct Automatic Updates to connect to specific intranet servers by configuring the registry of clients manually or by using Windows Update group policies.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 4) - The Automatic Updates Client
The client component of SUS is Windows Automatic Updates, which is supported on Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003. The Automatic Updates client is included with Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000 Service Pack 3, and Windows XP Service Pack 1.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 3) - Synchronizing SUS, Approving Updates
On the SUS Administration Web page, click Synchronize Server. On the Synchronize Server page (shown in Figure 3), you can start a manual synchronization or configure automatic, scheduled synchronization.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 2) - Configuring and Administering SUS - Configuring Software Update Services
Although some of the configuration of SUS can be specified during a custom installation, all SUS settings are accessible from the SUS Administration Web page.
Windows Server 2003 : Administering Software Update Services (part 1) - Installing SUS on a Windows Server 2003 Computer
SUS has both client and server components. The server component runs on a Windows 2000 Server (Service Pack 2 or later) or a Windows Server 2003 computer. Internet Information Services (IIS) must be installed before setting up SUS and, IIS is not installed by default on Windows Server 2003.
Windows 7 : Understanding the User Account Control - INTERACTING WITH THE UAC
Windows 7 takes a completely different approach to the UAC. When you open MSConfig now, you'll see a different option, as shown in Figure 1. Instead of simply disabling or enabling the UAC (it used to be called User Account Protection or UAP), the user sees an option to change the UAC settings.
Windows 7 : Understanding the User Account Control
Early network connections weren't much of a problem either, as long as the administrator kept the system clean. The problems started when users started connecting to the Internet and the potential sources of contamination became many and varied.
Windows Server 2003 : Supporting and Troubleshooting Terminal Server (part 5) - Managing User Sessions
Windows Server 2003 provides flexible and powerful ways to manage, troubleshoot, and optimize user sessions on terminal servers.
 
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